Tollbooths on the Highway to Knowledge Jobs / by Krista Boivie

Today I had a mini-revelation--it was the last time I would ever have to take a standardized test.  Although I am relieved to know this, I am not happy.  I retook the GMAT this morning with disastrous results.  My score was even lower than the first time I took it--and I didn't think that was possible.

I have never been good at standardized tests (or multiple choice exams).  Give me short answer or an essay and I can easily blow it out of the water, but give me a list of options and I am a goner.

The title of today's post is a paraphrase from Daniel Pink's book "A Whole New Mind" in it he describes standardized tests as the tollbooths on the highway to knowledge jobs.

These instruments all measure what is essentially undiluted L-Directed [Left-Brain] Thinking. They require logic and analysis—and reward test-takers for zeroing-in computerlike, on a single correct answer. This exercise is linear, sequential, and bounded by time.

For right-brained creative people these tests don't come close to demonstrating our skills and abilities.  As someone who is highly driven and prides myself on my intelligence, my failure to perform well on these tests is difficult.

The GMAT is the gateway exam to enter an MBA program.  I have applied, but with my low-test scores it seems fairly obvious that I will not be going to college this fall.  Of course, I haven't received a rejection letter yet--but the writing is on the wall.

With one possibility closing--it is now time to focus my energies on the other options I have.