The LEGO Movie / by Krista Boivie

Running Time: 1 hour 40 minutes

Rating: PG

Synopsis:

Unbeknownst to the citizens of Bricksburg, an nefarious plot is afoot to end the world as they know it. Lord Business (Will Ferrell) has collected an all powerful artifact called the Kragle, that can bring order to the chaotic LEGO universe and create the perfection he craves. The wizard Vitruvius (Morgan Freeman) has rallied all of the Master Builders to stop Lord business and he prophesied that “The Special” will arise and find The Piece of Resistance that can stop the Kragle. When the utterly average Emmet Brickowski (Chris Pratt) stumbles across The Piece of Resistance, he becomes an unlikely hero and the Master Builders must come together and help him reach his potential and save the world. 

Scott’s Review:

The LEGO Movie deserves to be commended for putting together one of the most brilliant voice casts I have ever had the pleasure of hearing, as well as filling the screen with dazzlingly creative animation. PrattFerrellFreemanElizabeth BanksWill ArnettChanning TatumJonah HillCharlie Day and many others do fantastic work bringing these figurines to life. The jokes are also dished out at a frenetic pace and they are aimed at the grown ups in the theatre more often than not. Plus you can tell that the people who made this movie have a real affection for the toys of their childhood and it infuses the movie with joy.

The limitless possibilities that go along with setting a movie in the LEGO universe actually work against this film because no matter what the animators show us, it can’t match what you are capable of imagining. The story came across as a little pedestrian because the tale of the unlikely hero has been told hundreds of times. There are few places to take it that it hasn’t already been and this version didn’t tread any new ground. There is also a live action scene between a father and son in the last act of the movie that takes us out of the LEGO world and grinds things to a halt. The scene feels like it only exists to remind us that these are real toys you can ACTUALLY play with, and it makes the movie come across as the most elaborate (though lovingly made) commercial of all time. This movie is mostly delightful, lighthearted and fun which casts its missteps in such stark relief that they are even harder to ignore. Good can feel a little disappointing, when you expect great. B